#OpeningDay

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One of the best things about baseball is that you can fail most of the time and still be considered a great success. Last season’s batting title went to Dee Gordon of the Miami Marlins with a .333 batting average, meaning he managed one measly hit for every three at bats. That’s a failure rate of 67% — two thirds of the time. Imagine being allowed that margin of error in your job! Most of us are barely permitted one mistake, let alone a 3 game batting slump. Consider child care professionals, for example. You could take care of a thousand kids, and deliver 999 of them back to their parents, safe and sound. But it’s that one kid you lost that they’ll never forget. “Sorry, Ed, you’ll have to forget your merit increase this year — I mean, there was that kid…”

Today is Opening Day of the 2016 season, and it got me thinking about a presentation I delivered a few years ago about what we in the workplace can learn from baseball. I think one of the greatest lessons is that you don’t have to win to be successful. As a major league ball player, you’re not going to win the World Series every year. You may not even make the Post Season. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have a successful season — because every at bat, or every trip to the mound, is an opportunity for success. If it doesn’t work out, there’s next inning. You don’t have to wait till tomorrow, or Monday (as we often tend to do from Thursday on…) to correct your mistakes and make it count.

One of the game’s greatest managers, Joe Torre, says:

“To me, success is playing — or working — to the best of your ability. And winning is a by-product of living up to your highest standards for your-self, getting the most out or your natural talents, reaching down and rooting out your own drive, courage and commitment… But success should be your daily focus. You can’t win every day, but you can succeed in fulfilling your potential as an individual and a team member.”

I often think about baseball coaches when I’m delivering a presentation, because you’re often trying to achieve the same thing — give a team of talented professions the tools, inspiration and motivation to succeed. Communication is so important in the pursuit of winning, be it on the diamond or in the office.

Why not look at it this way? Next time your about to give a presentation, see yourself in the locker room, on opening day. The entire season is ahead of you and anything is possible. The World Series is in reach, because you have the right time to get there. They have the talent, the skill and the drive. All you need to do is give them a little guidance, a few tips, and a touch of belief.

I’ve uploaded a version of the presentation I referenced earlier, with the new addition of the famous “bat-flip”.

Play ball.

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